MLM Training – How to Guarantee That Your Presentation Will Demand Your Prospect’s Attention

Tim Sales delves further into the topic of how to ensure that your prospect is interested in your presentation. Apply this know-how to your MLM business and see your results increase immediately!

First, let’s review the basic steps to getting good at presenting your MLM business. They are:

1. KNOW there are no born presenters or speakers, only those who have refined their skills.

2. Identify the skills to get good at.

3. Identify when you do one of those things correctly versus when you don’t do it correctly.

4. Do the correct behavior continually until you don’t even have to think about it.

Many people that are new to presenting think that the quality of a presenter is based on what he or she is saying. This is true to a degree, but there are MANY other things that make up a great presenter or a great presentation. We’ve all heard the phrase, “It’s not what you say, but how you say it.” I don’t know who said that first and in what context they said it, but I have found that both, “what you say” and “how you say it” are equally important.

Every subject you take up to study has a fundamental aspect that everything else is built on. The fundamental aspect that all of presenting is built upon are the 10 Communication Qualities.

When you read the MLM training content below, make sure you’re thinking of all audiences, meaning, don’t think I’m talking about just a one-on-one or just an in-home audience or an audience of thousands; what I’m going to share with you should be applied to EVERY presentation you give.

Those who have studied my MLM training will be familiar with what I’m going to share, but don’t think it’s exactly the same. The 10 Communication Qualities are applied a little differently in presenting.

The very first thing you need to get good at and take notice of when you do it correctly versus when you don’t do it correctly is:

Be INTERESTED in your audience; don’t try to be INTERESTING to them.

A presenter who is truly interested in his prospect, ONLY presents things that are valuable to the prospect. Whatever is presented must be relevant to the prospect. Relevant means, “having to do with.” Having to do with what? The prospect!

You might think that the fact that your company’s compensation plan pays out 60% is valuable to the prospect. Why? Because it’s valuable to you. In fact you can’t think of anything more important than that!

Allow me to tell you a quick story related to this. I emailed out a survey in which I asked a few questions to get feedback on what content I should train on in “Professional Presenter” (to be released soon). One of the questions I asked was “Think back to the last few presentations you’ve given that were unsuccessful. What went wrong?” One of the responses was a classic example of being INTERESTING versus being INTERESTED:

“I showed her the whole picture: the industry, the company, the products, and how a person got paid, and then she said, ‘I thought this was going to be more about the products, not how you make money. I couldn’t think about selling anything that I haven’t yet tried.’”

Don’t think I showed this example to you so that you will start presenting the products more than the business, because I have seen the exact reverse situation where the emphasis was on the product, but the prospect only cared about the money. The reason I showed that to you is for you to see that the WHOLE PICTURE as the presenter described it, was NOT the whole picture for that prospect. The prospect’s whole picture was the product.

So a simple qualifying question like, “In making a decision about a business, what’s most important to you?” would have prevented this disaster. To the simple qualifying question, the prospect probably would have replied something like, “I can’t sell any product I don’t like.” Thank you! NOW you present what’s interesting to the prospect. When you present what’s interesting TO the prospect, you are proving you’re interested IN the prospect.

1. When you’re presenting one-on-one, you would only present things that are relevant to that person. So first, you present what you know they’re interested in.

Sometimes you’re presenting something that a prospect(s) has no idea about. In this case, you need to educate them enough so that they can determine what they’re interested in. This is what I call “testing a topic.”

After giving the prospect an overview of your business or product, then you can test a topic, in the form of a question, and see if they have an interest in it. If not, don’t discuss it anymore. As an example, after discussing the product you can ask, “Do the margins you can make from selling the product have any interest to you?” If they reply, “Not really,” then you DON’T discuss the compensation plan; no matter how well you know it or how much you love talking about it!

2. When presenting to more than one person, you present what is relevant to the majority of the people in the room. As an example, if you have 70 people in the room and one of those is a doctor, don’t adjust your content so your whole presentation is directed to the doctor!

How would you know what is relevant to an audience? Well, you’d ask them. Walk around before the event starts and talk to people. Obviously this doesn’t change your PowerPoint slides, but it does give you the relevant information you need to transform your “interesting” presentation into something valuable to the prospect.

I hope this brings you success,

Tim Sales

To get a very thorough understanding of the 10 Communication Qualities that you must have to cause your prospect to talk to you, listen to you and follow your suggestions, visit the website link that is mentioned below.

Opening The Negotiation

Many people stumble at the opening of their negotiation. This can set the stage for a less than optimum outcome. Here are just a few points I find helpful to keep in mind when I start a negotiation.

1. Don’t set your initial offer near your final objective. Give yourself room to negotiate. It doesn’t matter what you are negotiating – hours on a project, scope-of-work, specifications, price, who’s going to do what, etc. When you start any negotiation you must assume the other party will always put their maximum positions on the table first. Equally important is the fact that they probably will not disclose to you the minimum they are willing to accept. Don’t be shy about asking for everything you might want and more-use this as your starting point.

2. Give yourself enough time to negotiate. Before you start make sure you have allowed a realistic amount of time for the negotiation process to take place. Hours, weeks or months-it will frequently take longer than you expect. Rushing through the negotiation almost always works against you.

3. Don’t assume you know what the other party wants. It is far more prudent to assume that you do not know and then proceed to discover the realities of the situation by patient testing and questioning. If you proceed to negotiate a deal on the basis of your own untested estimate, you are making serious mistake.

4. Do not assume that your aspiration level is high enough. It is possible that your demands are too modest, or too easy to achieve. The other party may not know what they want or may have a set of values quite different from your own.

5. Finally, never accept the first offer. Many people do if the offer is as good as they expected or hoped to get. There are two good reasons not to accept: First, the other party is probably willing to make some concessions. Second, if you take the first offer, the other party is often left with the feeling that they were foolish for starting too low. In any case, the negotiator who takes the first offer too fast makes a mistake.

Presentation Tip, One Tip to Get Their Attention!

Presentation Tip?

Get Their Attention

One Tip to Get Their Attention!

There is one presentation tip that can help you be a great presenter! Get the attention of your audience by doing this one thing.

Before I share this one thing, I want to remind you that to be a good speaker, you must be true to yourself! Be who YOU are during a presentation. Learn from others, but don’t try to be “like” anyone else. I encourage you to be a More Fabulous You!

If you are comfortable giving a speech, then your audience will be comfortable. There is NOTHING worse than a presenter who is so nervous they find it difficult to get the words out, or they may be fidgeting, or fighting with their technology. When this happens, the audience can feel it, and they want out as much as the presenter!

Learning presentation strategies should help you become more comfortable, not be more stressed out.

Presentation Tip – Increase Audience Participation

The one thing that you can do to increase participation – have GIVEAWAYS! Yes, give your audience something in return for answering a question. Everybody wants something for free. I have always been amazed at the concept, but it does work!

Everyone Likes Giveaways

Men, women and even the wealthy enjoy giveaways. I was attending a fundraiser with high dollar donors, and they wanted the giveaways too! I was surprised because they could have bought what was being given away. Do NOT underestimate the power that a giveaway can have!

Examples of Small, Fun Giveaways

A giveaway does not have to be high dollar. Below are a few suggestions for smaller giveaways. The more expensive a giveaway, the more specialized your audience will be. The small giveaways are good to keep attention while keeping it economical for the presenter or speaker.

  • Gum – Double Bubble works well for this – younger audiences love candy giveaways!
  • Hard Candy
  • Suckers – these are normally a huge hit
  • Fun pens or pencils
  • Notepads
  • Coloring Books for Adults
  • Books – Related to the topic or written by the speaker
  • Admission Ticket or Coupon – local event that requires a ticket
  • Gift Card – small amounts work well too!

Advantages of Giveaways

The next time you are preparing for a presentation, consider the power that a giveaway can have for your success. Several advantages are listed below.

  1. Attention Grabbing – Keeps the audience attention
  2. Fun – Provides fun during the presentation – everyone enjoys “winning.”
  3. Interaction – Gets the audience interacting with the content (HUGE)
  4. Highlights the Audience – Doesn’t keep the spotlight on the speaker
  5. Longevity – After the presentation, the audience will talk about the giveaways

In conclusion, when preparing for a presentation, consider giveaways as a great way to increase interaction. Your success as a presenter can be enhanced by introducing giveaways!